Arvon SF Writing Course

Arvon are putting on a Science Fiction writing course again, once more tutored by Simon Ings, and this year Geoff Ryman.

Here’s what they say about it:

Immerse yourself in a five days science fiction writing course with two leading sci-fi writers Simon Ings (founder of Arc and editor of The New Scientist magazine) and Geoff Ryman (winner of 15 awards including the Arthur C Clarke and the Nebula Awards). Arguably, science fiction handles the contemporary world more effectively, wittily and playfully than any other kind of literature.

We’ll look at the tools of science fiction to see what they offer writers in an age of technological revolution. We will also explore various pressing contemporary questions concerning genre. How does writing for a SF readership differ from literary writing and what qualities do they share? Is it possible to write science fiction that works with a literary audience and indeed can any writer control for whom they write?

The five days include morning workshops, one to one tutorials and lots of time to write away from distractions in a beautiful countryside setting in West Yorkshire.

Celebrating British SF in the BEST OF BRITISH season

Featured

The ScienceFictionBookClub.org in London are holding a three month long season celebrating British SF called the Best of British. It will feature a selection of classic & contemporary SF over Sept, Oct & Nov 2015.

Celebrating British SF in the BEST OF BRITISH season

The September selection of books has already been announced & includes a work from this years BSFA Award short-list with Nina Allan’s The Race.

SEPTEMBER 2015 BEST OF BRITISH SELECTION*

  • The pages for each individual book required a login.

The September 2015 Best of British selection

BSFA/SFF AGM Saturday June 6th 2015

Join us on Saturday, 6 June 2015!

brian-aldiss-portr_2354088b patc
The Science Fiction Foundation (SFF), the British Science Fiction Association (BSFA), and the Imperial College Science Fiction and Fantasy Society (ICSF) will be holding a joint 2015 mini-convention on Saturday, 6 June 2015.  10 am – 4:30 pm.

Our guests of honour will be Brian Aldiss and Pat Cadigan.  Join us for interviews, panels, and the BSFA and SFF AGMs!

The event is FREE, although membership in the BSFA and SFF are required to vote in their respective AGMs.  See bsfa.co.uk or www.sf-foundation.org/events/index.html for updates.

Location:  Lecture Theatre 1, Blackett Laboratory Building. Imperial College, London.
The entrance is on Prince Consort Road, on the south side near Queens Gate Road.

9:30 am      Doors Open
10:00 am  Welcome
10:05 am  “The Girl-Thing who went out for Sushi”: A Discussion
10:55 am – 11:05 am – Short break
11:05 am – 11:55 am – Brian Aldiss, interviewed by Scott Pack

[Lunch will be from Noon until 2:30 pm at the Imperial College Eastside Bar. It’s on the ground floor of Linstead Hall part of Eastside halls of residence in Prince’s Gardens. Princes Gardens, London SW7 1LY; anyone not involved in the AGMs is welcome to gather there while the AGMs are ongoing.  Cake will be done there, since it’s not allowed in the auditorium.]

Noon – 12:45 pm – BSFA AGM
12:45 pm – Lunch Break [Official venue: Eastside Bar]
1:10 pm – Cake! [Eastside Bar]
1:30 pm – 2:15 pm – SFF AGM
2:30 pm – 3:20 pm – Pat Cadigan, Interviewed by Tanya Brown
3:30 pm – 4:20 pm – Growing up with Aldiss’s Work (Panel)
4:30 pm – Finish

The event is FREE, although membership in the BSFA and SFF are required to vote in their respective AGMs.
See bsfa.co.uk or www.sf-foundation.org/events/index.html for updates.

Annual General Meeting 2015

Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the British Science Fiction Association Ltd will be held at:

Lecture Theatre 1, Blackett Laboratory Building. Imperial College, London

 on Saturday 6th June 2015 at midday for the following purposes:

1.     To approve the Minutes of the previous Annual General Meeting

2.     To approve the financial statements for the year ended 30 September 2014

3.     To receive and consider the Annual Review of the Year.

4.     Elections: The following Directors retire by rotation and offer themselves for re-election: D R Langford, A Sawyer & M T Potts.

5.     Any Other Business

A proxy form is attached here for use if a member is unable to attend and wishes to appoint a proxy for voting purposes, along with a copy of the AGM 2014 minutes and draft financial statements for the year ended 30 September 2014 for approval at the meeting.
 
Martin Potts
Treasurer

2015 BSFA Lecture

The 2015 BSFA Lecture at Dysprosium (the 2015 Eastercon) will be given by Dr Simon Trafford (Institute of Historical Research), and is entitled ‘“Runar munt þu finna”: why sing pop in dead languages?’ The lecture will be given at 5.30 pm on Saturday April 4th, in the Discovery room of the Park Inn, Heathrow. The lecture is open to any member of Dysprosium.

Simon Trafford is Lecturer in Medieval History and Research Training Officer at the University of London’s Institute of Historical Research. He specialises in the history and archaeology of the later Anglo-Saxon period in the north-east of England. He completed his undergraduate studies and his D.Phil. at the University of York, where his supervisor was Professor Edward James, who sf fans know as current Chair of the Science Fiction Foundation. Simon has a particular interest in the depiction of Vikings in popular culture. His talk for us develops this, with a special focus upon the use of dead ancient and medieval languages in pop and rock songs.

The BSFA Lecture is intended as a companion to the George Hay Lecture, which is presented at the Eastercon by the Science Fiction Foundation. Where the Hay Lecture invites scientists, the BSFA Lecture invites academics from the arts and humanities, because we recognise that science fiction fans aren’t only interested in science.  The lecturers are given a remit to speak “on a subject that is likely to be of interest to science fiction fans” – i.e. on whatever they want!  This is the eighth BSFA Lecture.

News roundup

Here at BSFA Towers we get various items of news about forthcoming events sent to us; but we aren’t always too good about disseminating them.

When I say “we”, I mean “I”, of course. My fellow committee members and Towers-dwellers are lovely and excellent and would never sit for weeks on something that came in via the contact form.

Anyway, to make up for my tarditude (a new word I’ve just invented), here are four items of interest that have come in recently. My apologies to the various organisations for them all being in a collected post.

Cheltenham Literature Festival

Hanna Goldschmidt writes:

I am contacting you on behalf of The Times and The Sunday Times Cheltenham Literature Festival, which takes place 3 – 12 October in the centre of town, as you may know. We have just announced our programme for 2014, and there are a number of events that would be of interest to your members, readers and visitors.

I would like to especially highlight our series of Science Fiction and Fantasy events. Celebrating Sci Fi and Fantasy, River of London author Ben Aaronovitch, Mitch Benn and Joe Abercrombie discuss their latest works. Another special event featuring Jem Roberts, Ed Victor and Terry Jones will pay tribute to Douglas Adams, best known for his iconic work The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. http://www.cheltenhamfestivals.com/literature/whats-on/grid?genres=232

Please also visit our general programme for more information on the overall Festival schedule, including topics such as Fiction, Lifestyle, Current Affairs or Studio, Stage & Screen: http://www.cheltenhamfestivals.com/literature/whats-on/grid

English PEN

Rebekah from English PEN — who recently hosted Audrey Niffenegger’s excellent talk at Loncon 3 — says:

I’m writing to let you know about a science fiction/literary event taking place on Monday 6 October at Southbank Centre in London.

English PEN is the founding branch of an international writers’ organisation/free speech charity, of which HG Wells was an early president.

Science Fiction: Home of the Literary Activist‘ will take HG Wells as a starting point for a discussion on what it is about activism that engages the SF community. Often, especially on matters regarding freedom of expression, readers and writers of the science fiction genre are particularly active in English PEN’s campaigns.

The event will take the form of a panel discussion chaired by Sophie Mayer, featuring writers Nick Harkaway, James Smythe and Gwyneth Jones and editor Anne C. Perry.

De Montfort University call for papers

Peter Conde says;

Please find enclosed a call for papers for the De Montfort University Narratives of Cyber event taking place on 26th November

CALL FOR PAPERS: Prometheus, COLOSSUS, HAL … and Beyond:  The Narratives of ‘Cyber’

De Montfort University, The Curve Theatre, Leicester:  26th November 2014

When a nation is powerful it tells the world confident stories about the future. The stories can be enchanting or frightening. But they make sense of the world. But when that power begins to ebb, the stories fall apart. And all that is left are fragments, which haunt you like half-forgotten dreams.
(Adam Curtis)

This one-day conference seeks to draw together academics and practitioners from as many different fields as possible, to encourage debate and discussion around the complex, contentious and contested theme of ‘cyber’, information technology, and the relationship between Human and Machine.

Humanity structures its vision of the world through constructed narratives (cultural, religious, political…) which seek to explain and justify our reading of reality; what are the narratives which have shaped and are shaping our existence as individuals and groups in a realm mediated and ordered through technology? As Grant Morrison puts it. “We live in the stories we tell ourselves”; what are the stories we tell ourselves about our relationship with the computer?

We seek proposals (300 words maximum) for papers of 20 minutes duration approaching these issues from as wide a range of perspectives as possible. A non-exhaustive list of subject areas might include:

  • Literary and cinematic visions of the information age
  • Robotics, cyborgs and transhumanism
  • Cyber-dissidence and resistance
  • Technophila and technophobia
  • Definitions of ‘cyberculture’

and many more…

All proposals must be received by 30th September 2014. (Speakers will be informed of acceptance within 1 week of deadline.)

Please send your paper proposal, and any requests for further information, to:

Email: cybertalk@softbox.co.uk (email heading “Cybernarratives proposal”)

Tel: 01347 812100

Web: www.softbox.co.uk/cybertalk

Arvon residential Science Fiction writing course

From Emma Feasey we hear:

I am writing to let you know about a residential Science Fiction writing course we are running later this year. Our courses take place in beautiful countryside locations, with a mixture of workshops, individual tutorials and time and space to write.

SCIENCE FICTION: Dreams and visions 20th – 25th October 2014, Totleigh Barton, Devon

In a world hemmed in by clocks, schedules and ‘business as usual’, science fiction reminds us of the value of dreams, capturing our epic capacity for good and evil. Build imaginary worlds, join in philosophical games, crack wild and bitter jokes and conjure visions both alarming and alluring. For all prose writers keen to experiment, the week will introduce a genre spectacularly in tune with our times.

Tutors:

  • Simon Ings edits Arc, a literary quarterly from New Scientist. His books include The Eye, A History of Vision, and novels The Weight of Numbers and Dead Water. He is writing a history of Soviet science.
  • Liz Jensen is the author of eight novels spanning several genres, including science fiction, among them Ark Baby, The Rapture and The Uninvited. Her work has been nominated for several awards, developed for film, and translated into more than 20 languages.

Guest: M. John Harrison’s novel Climbers won the Boardman Tasker Prize in 1989. His most recent novel is Empty Space.
http://www.arvon.org/course/science-fiction/

Special August London Meeting: Ian McDonald Interviewed by Tony Keen

** Location: Canada Water Library, Learning Rooms 2 and 3, 21 Surrey Quays Rd, London SE16 7AR (Directly above Canada Water Station, building is accessible to all)

Ian McD

On Thursday* 14th of August, 2014, Ian McDonald (author of BSFA award winning The Dervish House, Brasyl, River of Gods, etc.) will be interviewed by Tony Keen (former meetings organiser for the BSFA).

ALL WELCOME – FREE ENTRY (Non-members welcome)

The interview will start promptly at 6 p.m.

*** Please note the different time, date and place for this meeting. This is due to the Loncon3 Convention being held at the Excel Centre. Canada Water is an easy 20 minutes from the venue, as well as being convenient to central London.Canada Water Library and Culture Space is situated directly above Canada Water station (Jubilee line and London overground). Exit the station towards Surrey Quays Shopping Centre.

Map is Here

FUTURE EVENTS:

24th September 2014- Sarah Maitland, interviewed by Farah Mendlesohn

22nd October 2014- David Bradley (SFX Magazine) interviewed by TBA

26th November 2014- TBC

July BSFA London Meeting: Geoff Ryman interviewed by Graham Sleight

Location: Upstairs, The Artillery Arms, 102 Bunhill Row, London, EC1Y 8ND

 

geoff-ryman1

On Wednesday 30th of July 2014, Geoff Ryman (science fiction, fantasy and slip-stream author of award winning novels-including BSFA Award winner Air) will be interviewed by Graham Sleight (Science Fiction critic).

ALL WELCOME – FREE ENTRY (Non-members welcome)

The interview will start at 7 pm. We have the room from 6 pm (and if early, fans are in the ground floor bar from 5ish).

There will be a raffle (£1 for five tickets), with a selection of sf novels as prizes.

Map is here.

FUTURE EVENTS:

14th August 2014, Canada Water Library, 6 p.m.- Ian MacDonald, interviewed by Tony Keen

24th September 2014- Sarah Maitland, interviewed by Farah Mendlesohn

22nd October 2014- David Bradley (SFX Magazine) interviewed by TBA

BSFA Lecture at Loncon 3

paula-jamesA special BSFA Lecture will be given at Loncon 3 by Dr Paula James (Open Unversity), and is entitled ‘Pygmalion’s Statue and her Synthetic Sisters: The Perfect Woman on Screen′. The lecture will be given at 20.00 on Saturday August 16th, the ExCel Centre, London Docklands. The lecture is open to any member of Loncon 3.

Paula James is a familiar face and voice to anyone who has studied the Open University’s Arts Foundation courses over the past fifteen years or so, or any of their courses in Classical Studies. Paula is Senior Lecturer in Classical Studies and Staff Tutor in Arts at the OU. She began her academic career after raising her family, and joined the Open University in the 1990s. She is an expert in Latin Literature, particularly the Metamorphoses of Ovid and Apuleius. She also writes on the reception of Latin texts in modern cinema. She has written an excellent introduction to Ancient Rome, Understand Roman Civilization, now in its second edition, and has jointly edited works on the imagery of Trade Union banners and the parrot in literature. Her most recent book is Ovid’s Myth of Pygmalion on Screen: In Pursuit of the Perfect Woman (2013), and it is from this work that her talk to us is derived.

The BSFA Lecture is intended as a companion to the George Hay Lecture, which is presented at the Eastercon by the Science Fiction Foundation. Where the Hay Lecture invites scientists, the BSFA Lecture invites academics from the arts and humanities, because we recognise that science fiction fans aren’t only interested in science. The lecturers are given a remit to speak “on a subject that is likely to be of interest to science fiction fans” – i.e. on whatever they want! This is a special lecture for Worldcon, and is the seventh BSFA Lecture.

Gordon Rutter: Dr Who in An Exciting Adventure With Charles Fort

David V Barrett tells us:

Dr Who has graced our television screens for over fifty years now and the show has seen a myriad of adventures. Everyone knows the Daleks but there are a host of lesser known adversaries and story lines, some of which Charles Fort would surely have approved.

There are a wealth of Fortean themes and mysteries in the history of the world’s longest running science fiction TV show; come along to hear and explore some of them.

Gordon Rutter is a life-long Dr Who fan, author, regular contributor to the Fortean Times, regular speaker at the Fortean Times UnConvention, head of the Charles Fort Institute, runs the Edinburgh Fortean Society and probably still holds the world record for the greatest number of straws shoved into one human being’s mouth.

Venue: The Bell, 50 Middlesex Street, London E1 7EX

Date: Wednesday 16th July 2014

Time 19.45-22.45

Cost: £3/£2 concs

London Fortean Society regulars should note that for this event we’re back in our old venue.

More details at the Facebook page

He adds that it would be worth getting there by 7:30 to be sure of a seat.

June BSFA London Meeting: Stephanie Saulter Interviewed by Kate Keen

Location: Upstairs, The Artillery Arms, 102 Bunhill Row, London, EC1Y 8ND

130420_S Saulter_179-Edit

On Wednesday 25th of June 2014, Stephanie Saulter  (author of Gemsigns and Binary, the first two books of the ®Evolution trilogy) will be interviewed by Kate Keen (SFF Trustee and Head of Fanfic at Nine Worlds)

ALL WELCOME – FREE ENTRY (Non-members welcome)

The interview will start at 7 pm. We have the room from 6 pm (and if early, fans are in the ground floor bar from 5ish).

There will be a raffle (£1 for five tickets), with a selection of sf novels as prizes.

Map is here.

FUTURE EVENTS:

30th July 2014- Geoff Ryman, interviewed by Graham Sleight

Date and Location TBA August- Ian MacDonald, interviewed by Tony Keen

24th September 2014- Sarah Maitland, interviewed by Farah Mendlesohn

SFF Masterclass still accepting applications

The SFF are still accepting applications for the 2014 Science Fiction Foundation Masterclass, an enriching experience for anyone interested in improving their writing about Science Fiction and Fantasy. Please send a sample of writing and a one-page cv to farah.sf@gmail.com.

Please share this as widely as possible. Thanks.

The importance of Writing Groups

Whether you’re starting out as a writer or you are someone with more experience, having a support network to read, critique and advise you on your work can be hugely valuable.

Over at Fantasy Faction, a great website filled with reviews and articles, Adrian Faulkner has taken a look at the subject of writing groups, interviewing the BSFA’s own Terry Jackman about the Orbits group.

Check out the articles here:

http://fantasy-faction.com/2013/writing-groups-part-one

http://fantasy-faction.com/2013/writing-groups-part-two

 

September BSFA London Meeting: Gareth L. Powell Interviewed by Jon Oliver

 

Location: Upstairs, The Artillery Arms*, 102 Bunhill Row, London, EC1Y 8ND

 

On Wednesday 25th of September 2013, Gareth L. Powell (author of The Recollection, Ack-Ack Macaque and Hive Monkey) will be interviewed by Jonathan Oliver (Editor-in-Chief of Solaris Books).

ALL WELCOME – FREE ENTRY (Non-members welcome)

The interview will start at 7 pm. We have the room from 6 pm (and if early, fans are in the ground floor bar from 5ish).

There will be a raffle (£1 for five tickets), with a selection of sf novels as prizes.

Map is here.

FUTURE EVENTS:

30th October 2013- Mary Robinette Kowal , interviewed by Virginia Preston **

27th November 2013- Dr. Who Magazine, interviewed by Graham Sleight

As is customary, there will be no event in December.

*Please note that this is our second meeting at a NEW venue for London meetings! There was also some concern about the lack of vegetarian options at the pub, but there is the lovely Carnevale Mediterranean Vegetarian Restaurant nearby.

**Note that this is a month with five Wednesdays. The meeting will be on the last Wed. of the month.

 

FUTURA Competition Winner – Plus A Guide To Wonderful Wolverhampton!

Congratulations to BSFA member Nicholas Whyte who won two free tickets to FUTURA in our latest competition! Well done from all of us here at the BSFA.

With the FUTURA convention coming to Wolverhampton (my old stomping ground) in just under a fortnight’s time, just what can I tell con-goers about the place?

Futura competition_html_43445988

Wolverhampton is now officially in the Black Country – although people have been arguing about that since the name came about. The most significant speculative fiction to be inspired by the region’s grimy history is easily Lord of the Rings. J. R. R. Tolkien spent his formative years in the pretty rural town of Sarehole before moving to Moseley, and was aware of the grim Black Country in the distance. Though the horrors of the World War I trenches were also influential, the link between “the land of shadow,” the home of “dark smithies” that he called Mordor (The Black Land in Elvish) and the Black Country is clearly made. And as Mordor has become the touchstone for every shadowy, grim place in fantastical literature derived from Tolkien, every bog of eternal stench, then the Black Country is surely the source of them all.

Out of Darkness Cometh Light

Wolverhampton’s motto is “Out of Darkness Cometh Light”, and since the millennium, a growing number of writing groups and initiatives have sprung up within the city, offering a supportive network for writers.

On the site of the old Chubb lock-making factory, Wolverhampton’s Light House has become a hub for the city’s creative sorts. Featuring an independent 2-screen cinema, gallery space and the Lock Works Café, it frequently hosts exhibitions, festivals, craft fairs and comedy and spoken word nights.

And now FUTURA comes to Wolverhampton; an absolute treat for enthusiasts of speculative fiction. And a not so small part of me hopes some post-industrial heritage-inspired writing comes out of the event to really put the place on the map in terms of science fiction.

One Ring-Road to Rule Them All!

Visitors to Wolverhampton these days will find a city combining pleasing Georgian architecture with a modern, busy pedestrianized shopping centre and a good old-fashioned market quarter. So if you’re coming to Wolverhampton for FUTURA, here’s my guide to places to go to make the most of your weekend.

Places to Visit

If you can nip out to visit Wolverhampton Art Gallery on Lichfield Street you will find all sorts from contemporary exhibitions to oil paintings, and there’s a gallery dedicated to Pop Art. The cake in the cafe is excellent, too. Open Monday – Saturday: 10am – 5pm, free admission. Linger outside on the hour to see the bizarre clock do its thing!

Over on Finchfield Road, you will find the beautiful Bantock House Museum – an Edwardian house surrounded by formal gardens and acres of parkland. Great for a picnic, but they also have a cafe run by the same people as the art gallery – so, yes, the cake is excellent. Open Tuesday – Sunday: 11am – 5pm, free admission.

St Peter’s Collegiate Church, just behind the art gallery, dates mainly from the 16th Century, though the chancel was completed in 1867. Some of the building has been there since 1425. The Anglo-Saxon cross base out in the churchyard is a must-see.

Slightly further afield, Wightwick Manor out on Wightwick Bank is a delightful Victorian arts and crafts house, built by the Mander family of philanthropic industrialists after being inspired by a lecture by Oscar Wilde on ‘the House Beautiful’.  Inside, you will find their collection of Pre-Raphaelite art and see furniture and decorations by William Morris. Prices £4.80 child, £9.50 adult with gift aid to see the whole house and garden. The garden and tea room is open from 11am on that weekend, and the house from noon, closing at 5pm.

Food and Drink

Venturing into town for a beer you might like to try The Posada on Lichfield Street, a proper old-fashioned real ale pub. Unfortunately it doesn’t offer food.

If rock, metal, Goth etc is your thing, then you have to go to The Giffard Arms on Victoria Street. Looks scary, actually pretty friendly. No food here either, though.

The Hogshead on Stafford Street on the other hand does do food, and also serves real ale. Gets very busy, though! Quite popular with students.

Close to the station on Corn Hill is Holdens pub The Great Western, with excellent guest ales and nice food. Recommended!

Travelling further out, try The Crooked House, 3.5 miles away in Gornal. A quirky building with fantastic beer and excellent locally sourced food.

Wolverhampton has an abundance of curry houses. A lot of people like the rough and ready cheapness of Jivans on Broad Street, but if eating off paper plates isn’t for you there are plenty of other places, particularly on Cleveland street; a good central one is The New Spice on School Street. Many good Indian restaurants are out of the town centre – you could also try Indigo on the Warstones Road, Shimla on Stafford Road, Fordhouses, or Penn Tandoori, Lower Penn.

If you just want a nice cup of tea and a cake try the gallery, or Madame Clarke’s on King Street.

Shopping

Wolverhampton has a brilliant market square and indoor market, where you can purchase faggots, scratchings and grey peas and bacon if you so wish! Below the market is an antiques centre where you can pick up vintage clothes and accessories, knick knacks, collector toys and memorabilia, vinyl records and second hand books. It’s open 8.30am – 4.30pm on Saturdays.

More second hand books can be found at The Old Bookshop on Bath Street, near the brewery.

There are also loads of alternative/vintage clothing stores. Look out for Penny Farthing, Nefaria, Rowfers, Trisha’s and Equinox.

I look forward to seeing you in Wolverhampton!

 

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Anywhere But Here, Anywhen But Now: Terry Pratchett First Novel Shortlist Announced

Yet more awards news, award-watchers… this time for the Terry Pratchett Prize’s First Novel Award – aka Anywhere But Here, Anywhen But Now.

TerryPratchettPrize

The prize was first launched two years ago, with a prize of £20,000 for previously unpublished novelists. Sir Terry Pratchett said at the time that he was looking for “stories set on Earth, although it may be an Earth that might have been, or might yet be, one that has gone down a different leg of the famous trousers of time […] the possibilities are literally endless, but remember, it’s all on Earth. Maybe the continents will be different and the climate unfamiliar, but the physics will be the same as ours. What goes up must come down, ants are ant-sized because if they were any bigger their legs wouldn’t carry them. In short, the story must be theoretically possible on some version of the past, present or future of a planet Earth.”

The shortlisted novels and  novelists this year, drawn from over 500 entrants, are:

The Unspoken Death of the Amazing Flying Boy by Jean Burdett

Bloodline by Sophie Constable

The Hive by Alexander Maskill

The Way Through the Woods by Robin Pearson

A Kill in the Morning by Graeme Shimmin

The Shadows of Annwn by Catherine Whittle

The judging panel is comprised of Sir Terry Pratchett, Rob Wilkins, Editorial Director Simon Taylor, Publicist Lynsey Dalladay and Alex Veasey from The Forbidden Planet. A winner will be announced on the 31st May.